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A History of Violence

Posted By Alex Belth On September 7, 2012 @ 7:53 am In 1: Featured,Arts and Culture,Bookish,Creative Process,Links: Interviews,Pop Culture,Television | Comments Disabled

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Check out Carlo Rotella’s 2008 Washtington Post Magazine profile [2] of the novelist and screenwriter George Pelicanos [3]:

Pelecanos was a writer, story editor and producer for “The Wire.” He wrote crucial scenes as different as the ex-junkie Bubbles’ breakthrough at a 12-step meeting and the western-style standoff in an alley between Omar Little, the street legend who robs drug dealers, and Brother Mouzone, the prim shootist from New York. Pelecanos also created Cutty, a character who turns away from the street life and opens a boxing gym, and gave “The Wire” its Greek gangsters, even providing the background voices shouting in Greek when the cops raided a warehouse. In story meetings, he refereed arguments between Simon and Ed Burns, the show’s other co-creator.

“Ed and I are often butting heads in a way that somebody who doesn’t know us might think is toxic,” Simon told me. “George’s essential role was to be the gravitas, to make the decision. We’d present our best arguments, and he’d sit and listen until he couldn’t stand it any longer. He was the one with the storytelling chops to decide. He has a really strong ear for theme and idea. He writes books and scripts that are about something. When George says you won an argument, you feel good because it means the idea was good.”

Expanding on his description of Pelecanos as a moralist, Simon said: “We didn’t know we needed Cutty until George invented him. It’s not about plotting, it’s about defining some aspect of human endeavor that wasn’t covered by other characters. Institutionally, not much is redeemed in ‘The Wire,’ yet all of us believe in the individual’s ability to act. George said, ‘We need a moral center.’_”

Burns told me a story about scripting the death of Wallace, a likable corner boy gunned down by his pals. “It could have been just Bodie, who was pretty much a monster back then, who would just walk up and kill him. But that would have left nothing for Poot, and it would have sealed Bodie as a character. The way George wrote it, Bodie can’t finish it, and Poot, who’s a good friend of Wallace, has to step up and do it. That transcends genre; that’s squeezing all the juice out of a scene.” Bodie opens up as a character from that point, grappling with a dawning understanding that the large forces bearing down on him make it almost impossible for him to act honorably and survive. “That’s why you hire writers like George,” said Burns, “because they find what’s inside a scene, what’s inside the character.”

This piece is featured in a compelling new collection of Rotella’s non fiction work: Playing in Time [4].

I highly recommended it.

[Photo Credit: Ian Allen for Stop Smiling [5]]


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URL to article: http://www.bronxbanterblog.com/2012/09/07/a-history-of-violence-2/

URLs in this post:

[1] Image: http://www.bronxbanterblog.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/20090114140002_pelecanos.jpg

[2] Carlo Rotella’s 2008 Washtington Post Magazine profile: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/07/15/AR2008071502119.html?sid=ST2008071801830

[3] novelist and screenwriter George Pelicanos: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/discussion/2008/07/17/DI2008071701733.html

[4] Playing in Time: http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/P/bo13559044.html

[5] Ian Allen for Stop Smiling: http://www.stopsmilingonline.com/story_detail.php?id=1175

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