"A New York Treasure" --Village Voice

Saving Face

IMG_6931

That what the Mets want to do tonight. More than that, they just need a win.

The Yanks. Well, we’re still root, root, rootin’ for our boys.

Never mind the ruckus:

Let’s Go Yank-ees!

Why Can’t Be Friends?

IMG_5826

I’ve got a friend who cannot stand Mark Teixeira—who seems like a benign guy to hate but the more I think of it, I can see it. Sort of like hating a guy like Raffey Palmerio. Not really hatable but irritating enough to turn into something disagreeable. Especially if he is not on your team. Well, Tex got under the Mets’s skin last night, particularly reliever Hansel Robles, who appeared to psyche himself out believing Tex was psyching him out.

Oh, well. Yanks won, 9-4 in a game that certainly more painful for the Mets to lose than it was for the Yanks to win.

We’ll take it.

Back in the BX

IMG_6272

Our Raise-the-White-Flag Yanks host the Mets for a pair starting tonightski.

Never mind those cheerin’ Mets fans:

Let’s Go Yank-ees!

The Old Man….Is Down the Road

A Rod pop up

Is this the end of the line for Alex Rodriguez and the Yankees? M’eh, could be…

Yeah, and the Mets thumped the Yanks last night, 7-1.

 

Serious

IMG_7711

Seriously, that was a fun win last night. Pretty funny when the Yanks are in the tank and can play the spoiler.

Never mind the future:

Let’s Go Yank-ees!

Everything Must Go

50960012

Well, almost everything: Beltran—hugely likable—goes to the Rangers, and Nova—woulda, coulda, shoulda—goes to the Pirates.

Cleveland Rush

WOWZERS-640x360

graphic credit: mashthebuttons.com

So it appears that the Cleveland Indians believe they have what it takes to knock the hustle on the reigning World Series champion Kansas City Royals by fulfilling the wish of most Yankee fans (around here, at least) and trading for their All Star closer Andrew Miller. Yep, Cleveland beat out all comers to go for the gold, as it were.  Cashman, to his credit this season, had managed to acquire the top relieving talent in the AL and has been seemingly wise in what has to be a real first for Yankeedom; bartering good MLB players for good prospects.  Seriously, how often has this even happened, never mind worked out well for the Yankees in their history? The closest I could come up with (or at least the most recent example) was when the Yanks traded starting pitcher Doc Medich for, among others, up-and-coming rookie Willie Randolph in December 1975. That seemed to work out pretty well, if I recall. However, the Yanks have had a strong tendency as well know to be on the opposite side of the spectrum when dealing with prospects; usually giving away prospects (whom a lot of times turn into All Star talent) in exchange for OPP or middling MLB players who either break few waves or write regrettable footnotes in Yankee history.  Is it not fair to think of Jose Rijo, Fred McGriff, Jay Buhner  and other Yankee prospects from the early 80s (well into G. Steinbrenner’s reign of terror as Yankees overlord owner)  ending up as perennial All-Stars and borderline HoFers on other teams because of an incessant need for overvalued or ill-suited veterans led by shell-shocked or bi-polar managers who entered and departed like the steamy vapors of Old Faithful. HOw many of us felt the burn in those times, good times…

But this: unprecedented in nature and in scale.  Instead of discarding a useful veteran or cashing in a bunch of great prospects for a two-month playoff push in the hopes that they can catch the same lightning that David Justice brought with him many moons ago, instead of shuttling off a headache or embarrassment for the tender mercies of their trade partner’s leftovers, the Yanks have practically admitted something obvious to the entirety of the Yankee universe: rebuilding is a viable option.

Rebuild.  What a strange, funny little word that has for so long struck terror in the hearts of fans and administration alike, but somehow has managed to bring us a sense of relief in that now this team has a definitive plan, a course of action that says to all who observe that yes, the team does recognize the signs and has decided to focus on what lies ahead.  There are too many holes to patch, too much money in the pit and much more time on our hands than we know what to do with. But Cashman, the de facto Leader of the New School, somehow got the okay to look forward and trade a couple of his cash cows for some magic beans. And let’s be real, this is what they really are for now… so who are these magic beans exactly?

Clint Frazier; No. 2 prospect in the Cleveland Indians organization, an outfielder and No. 5 pick overall in 2013 (nj.com)

Justus Sheffield: No. 3 prospect of the organization, LH Starter in A-Ball, but no, he is NOT related to Gary Sheffield (contrary to this and other reports, it has been asserted as a myth) (nj.com)

And for gits and shiggles, they threw in a couple more minor league cheeseheads, Triple-A reliever Ben Heller and Double-A reliever J.P. Feyereisen. (yeah you guessed it, nj.com)

What does it all mean? Well, Cleveland’s obviously going for it, and they think highly enough of Miller that they can afford to give up at least two prized prospects to get him.  Good for Miller, he’s a very stand-up guy who deserves a shot at a ring during his prime, but while deserve’s got nothing to do with it, pundits are now seeing Cleveland as a true contender (the Royals seemingly spit the bit early on with injuries to key players and sub-par replacements) who will likely be waiting at the gate while Toronto, Baltimore, Texas and Houston figure out their respective positions. Provided that Miller stays healthy the rest of the way and Terry Francona doesn’t suddenly lose his mojo in the clubhouse, the playoff push promises to be pretty interesting.  For the Yanks: The future is now for one Dellin Betances (provided he doesn’t get traded himself, which doesn’t seem likely at this point, but we are treading unfamiliar waters here). If he stays, he will now get the chance to lock down the closer position for years to come; a position that was inherently his from the moment he came up, but required (and may still require) some seasoning before he could fully embrace it.  He’s got about two months. For the rest of the team, it’s put up or shut up.  The White Flag has been raised, the retooling begins.  Time to analyze who has an actual future with this team in 2017 or even within the next couple of months.  Do they sit down a couple of under-performing players and bring up kids to test them out? Does the hype of these major trades invigorate provoke the rest into Super Saiyin mode and they go on a .750 tear the rest of the way and burst into the playoffs as the most dynamic team this side of hydrogen and oxygen? Or do they play with their shoelaces the rest of the way? Perhaps a little from column A, B and C?

At any rate, this has been likely the most interesting part of the season to date.  So long, A. Chapman, so long A. Miller; you’ve both been great here and we thank you for keeping most of us at least peripherally interested in what’s happening at that mall we call Yankee Stadium nowadays, but it’s time to go forth and make history for your new teams (both Cleveland and the Chicago Cubs having a good chance to make big history by winning it all). while Betances holds down the fort and waits for the new arrivals to mature along with him and bring forth an interesting and perhaps exciting new era of baseball in New York; the likes of which we haven’t seen since the mid 90s perhaps? If so, it will likely change the narrative we’ve had on one Brian Cashman and cement his place in baseball not only as a visionary executive, but a legendary survivor.  Too much, too soon? It’s okay, we just made a couple of big trades that we don’t ordinarily do, as if they finally listened to us and said, “Eh, why not?”

We can afford a little bit of euphoria for a minute. We shall see.

Friday Night’s All Right

IMG_0836

Yanks vs. Rays in the dead of summer. A warm Friday night.

Meanwhile, Ichi is 2 hits away from 3,000. Perhaps he’ll get it this weekend. Matter of fact, you know it’s gonna happen, right? And it will be cool to see.

Never mind the moisture:

Let’s Go Yank-ees!

They Pack a Punch

IMG_1929

Aaaaand, thud: the Yanks drop the final game in Houston, 4-1.

Today gives a day off and maybe some trade rumors.

Hump Day in Houston

IMG_9040

Yanks finish up their 3-game series in Houston tonight looking for a sweep. Hey, stranger things have happened:

Never mind the brisket:

Let’s Go Yank-ees!

You Gotta Believe…?

IMG_6169

With the Yanks winning there is talk of contending…this year.

Fool’s Gold—although, Hell, with the way the playoffs are set up now, this kind of dreaming isn’t just encouraged it is halfway sensible.

Yanks won again last night but let us hope the Yankee brass doesn’t fool themselves here.

Onward.

When Yankee Stadium Was Under Construction

Ah, to be in the right place at the right time, that’s the spot Ross Lewis, an associate director for WCBS-TV news, found himself in October, 1973 when the old Yankee Stadium closed its doors. Lewis, 30, early into his second career as a professional photographer with the NFL, was there in the Bronx on October 1, the day after the final game.

Lewis returned in November and into the winter. In early ‘74, the construction teams briefly denied him access but the City of New York quickly worked out permission, and for the next two-and a half years, Lewis documented the transition between the old park and the new, modern stadium. The Yankees spent Nixon’s Watergate years—the Dog Day Afternoon, Taxi Driver era— playing crosstown in Queens, sharing Shea Stadium with the Mets. Meanwhile, as Hip Hop culture percolated in immediate vicinity, the new stadium came into shape.

Here is a taste Lewis’s fine work—a testament the architectural virtues of each stadium but also a thoughtful appreciation of the workers involved in the renovation, as well as the neighborhood people who watched them work. Now, forty years after the remodeled Stadium opened, Lewis is crafting models for an exclusive Fine Art book, as well as a photography exhibition. You can check out more his Yankee Stadium photos here.

In the meantime, enjoy.—AB

 

Oct 1, 1973—Bleachers.

Oct 1, 1973—Guard in doorway in outfield.

Oct 1, 1973–Guard in doorway in outfield.

October 1, 1973—Surveryor at work.

October 1, 1973—Surveryor at work.

Nov, 1973—Copper Frieze, Workers on infield.

Nov, 1973—Copper Frieze, workers on infield.

Nov, 1973—Upper Deck, left field with columns.

Nov, 1973—Upper deck, left field with columns.

March 18, 1974

March 18, 1974

March 18, 1974—The Second Dragon Back hoisted in place.

March 18, 1974—The second dragon back hoisted in place.

June 3, 1974—Dragon Back, sunburst.

June 3, 1974—Dragon Back, sunburst.

Aug. 20, 1974—Coffee Break.

Aug. 20, 1974—Coffee break.

August 20, 1974—Scaffold workers on partial wall.

August 20, 1974—Scaffold workers on partial wall.

Aug 26, 1975—Old man taking a stroll.

Aug 26, 1975—Old man taking a stroll.

Sept.19, 1975—Curiosity Viewers from Subway Platform.

Sept.19, 1975—Watching the progress from the subway platform.

Nov 24, 1975—Scoreboard lightbulb man silhouette.

Nov 24, 1975—Scoreboard lightbulb man.

Workers playing around, March, 1976.

The slide. Every man’s dream! April 5, 1976.

March 8, 1976—Painting the exterior walls.

March 8, 1976—Painting the exterior walls.

April 9, 1976—Yankee Logo being painted.

April 9, 1976—Yankee logo being painted.

April 11, 1976—The new field.

April 11, 1976—The new field.

April 11, 1976—The new park, ready to roll.

April 15, 1976—First game in the new park.

April 15, 1976—First game in the new park.

Opening Day 1976, featuring Joe DiMaggio, Joe Louis, Mickey Mantle, Whitey Ford and Billy Martin.

Opening Day 1976, featuring Joe DiMaggio, Joe Louis, Mickey Mantle, Whitey Ford and Billy Martin.

Seen This One Before?

IMG_4984

A 2-1 win. Go figure.

Onward, Ha!

50960003

Sorry about the locked-comments on the previous post and the lateness of this game thread.

Never mind the tardiness:

Let’s Go Yank-ees!

Afternoon Art

Spidey

Spidey by Hannah Blumenreich via This Isn’t Happiness.

The Brief But Productive Yankee Career of Aroldis Chapman

Minnesota Twins v New York Yankees

And so ends the brief but productive Yankee career of one Aroldis Chapman. The Yanks picked him up for a song last winter when Chapman’s name was mud. He served his time on a domestic abuse rap and once he got on the field, Chapman was as dramatic as promised—the left-handed version of fabled Yankee fireman, Goose Gossage, number 54 and throwing over one hundred. Never mind that some of us had a hard time rooting for him because of the domestic abuse stuff—that’s Chicago’s problem now as the Yanks send Chappy to the Cubs and their Whirled Serious dreams.

I’d say that worked out splendidly for Cashman and the Yanks—not to mention, Chapman—don’t you think? In fact, can you think of deal where the Yanks got more value out of less? Chapman pitched just a tick over 31 innings—for Adam Warren alone, 31 innings would be a steal. Then you throw some young dudes in the mix?

…Noice.

I’m pleased I got to see Chapman live once—and am not sorry to say goodbye, not for this haul.

[Photo Credit: Jim McIsaac/Getty Images]

Taster’s Cherce

noodles

Saveur gives us 33 Essential Asisan Noodle Recipes.

Heating Up

the human torch

The Yanks won’t cooperate in any losing business. They beat the Giants 5-2, behind a solid start from Nathan Eovaldi, to take 2 of 3 over the weekend.

Still, Mr. Chapman is on the block and the rumor mill is getting hotter than July 31—dig.

[Drawing by John Byrne]

We’re Havin’ a Heat Wave

50790010

So I was at the game on Friday night. Malcolm Gladwell threw out the first pitch and he would have made Dave LaRoche proud. It was an exciting game—sloppy, especially for the Giants, but exciting. Ton of Giants fans there—and yesterday afternoon, and today too, I’m sure—and it was nice to see them exit quietly. Yanks won a close one on Friday, lost a close one in extras yesterday.

Still hotter n July.

Never mind the out-of-towners:

Let’s Go Yank-ees!

Say Hey

50790001

It’s the Giants, and good gosh, Bumgarner’s pitching tonight.

Hotter than July in here in the city.

Never mind the heat wave:

Let’s Go Yank-ees!

feed Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share via email
"This ain't football. We do this every day."
--Earl Weaver