"A New York Treasure" --Village Voice
Tag: saul leiter

American Master

5605_14_fM_10_09_Saul_Leiter_portrait
Rest in peace, Saul Leiter, dead at 89. A beautiful artist.

Saul_Leiter

2625_1e234c66f6340a7_14
2625_1e234c66f6340a7_2

0GMGCA48VZAZCAJWS9YBCAE551EUCATMOAJ3CALR9AH9CAP51GTBCAQPKMF4CAU76IYQCA5EXZHZCASPF5B6CA2AFR7ACA7JGBMBCA9VIFMRCAT5W4W8CAPBLYOBCA5CUG0VCABPRGDUCA07CVUMCALP9FY6

Leiter_SBantryNova1960_56344

Leiter_Man_with_Straw_Hat_01-600x895

06SaulLeiter

02SaulLeiter_haircut1956

08-5.jpg

tumblr_mhvv7hnxUZ1qz6f9yo1_500

med_463-jpg

08-1

03SaulLeiter_ManOnLadder_1954

I563CA9OPFU1CAZPNHTACABNGRC2CAM023O2CA8ZC2PTCAWDXRQRCAIJM5IZCAZV2CARCAST8BRYCASEQON4CAVCILFACABL3H8MCA40O370CAENG9RECA33MTPFCABC0K2HCA0VHV02CAJ9N130CAJEG18L

saul leiter snow 1960

saul-leiter-25

leiter_7

5305521831_4e23714d87_b

tumblr_mij35lLoLm1r146zvo1_500

tumblr_m1bw0nS3Ta1qdwo7go1_1280

Saul-Leiter.-Lanesville-1958

picLeiterLanesvilleBlog-740144

Leiter:

“There are certain people who like to be in the swing of things, but I think I’ve been out of the loop a lot of the time. When Bonnard died, one critic accused him of not participating in the great adventures of Modernism. And Matisse wrote a letter in which he defended Bonnard, saying that when he saw the Bonnards in the Phillips collection, he told Mr. Phillips, ‘Bonnard was the strongest of us all.’

I’m not like those photographers who went up to the top of the mountain and hung over and took a picture that everyone said was impossible and then went home and printed it and sold 4,000 copies of it and then went on and on with one great achievement after another.

Max Kozloff said to me one day, ‘You’re not really a photographer. You do photography, but you do it for your own purposes – your purposes are not the same as others’. I’m not quite sure what he meant, but I like that. I like the way he put it.”

New York Minute

Saul Leiter: “I started out as a fashion photographer. One cannot say that I was successful but there was enough work to keep me busy. I collaborated with Harper’s Bazaar and other magazines. I had work and I made a living. At the same time, I took my own photographs.

“I spent a great deal of my life being ignored. I was always very happy that way. Being ignored is a great privilege. That is how I think I learnt to see what others do not see and to react to situations differently. I simply looked at the world, not really prepared for anything.”

A Leiter gallery over at On-Line Browsing.

Million Dollar Movie

My goodness, everything about this looks wonderful.

New York Minute

A New York minute in pictures brought to you by the great Saul Leiter.

New York Minute

 

Because I can’t get enough of Saul Leiter:

“There are certain people who like to be in the swing of things, but I think I’ve been out of the loop a lot of the time. When Bonnard died, one critic accused him of not participating in the great adventures of Modernism. And Matisse wrote a letter in which he defended Bonnard, saying that when he saw the Bonnards in the Phillips collection, he told Mr. Phillips, ‘Bonnard was the strongest of us all.’

I’m not like those photographers who went up to the top of the mountain and hung over and took a picture that everyone said was impossible and then went home and printed it and sold 4,000 copies of it and then went on and on with one great achievement after another.

Max Kozloff said to me one day, ‘You’re not really a photographer. You do photography, but you do it for your own purposes – your purposes are not the same as others’. I’m not quite sure what he meant, but I like that. I like the way he put it.”

Morning Art

Saul Leiter: snow shots.

“Canopy” (1957)

“Snow” (1960)

“Red Umbrella” (1958)

“Postmen” (1952)

Inspiration, as always, from This Isn’t Happiness.

Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby? (Standing in the Shadows)

“I spent a great deal of my life being ignored. I was always very happy that way. Being ignored is a great privilege. That is how I think I learnt to see what others do not see and to react to situations differently. I simply looked at the world, not really prepared for anything.”

Saul Leiter

Check out this incredible photo gallery

of Saul Leiter’s work

over at Online Browsing.

Afternoon Art

“Taxi” by Saul Leiter (1957)

Art of the Night


Another sure shot from Saul Leiter.

Afternoon Art

“Lanesville,” By Saul Leiter (1958)

Afternoon Art

“463,” By Saul Leiter (1956)

Afternoon Art

Saul Leiter. 1958

Morning Art

More from Retronaut:

Gorgeous color photography of NYC in the ’50s by Saul Leiter.

Enter Light

The New York Times Book Review has a good piece on Alexandra Styron’s family memoir:

Rose Styron [William's wife] emerges from this memoir as a good and heroic presence, erring only on the side of excessive tolerance. There is something touching in the picture of her following her husband to Martha’s Vineyard, having been “forbidden to show up before June,” with “a mountain of summer Martha’s Vineyard dresses poised on their hangers for another season’s whirl of festivities.” Before long, deprived not only of his temper but of all self-esteem, Styron would be pleading like a child to be spared the ordeal of appearing before guests at the dinner table.

“Avoiding my father’s wrath was a complicated business,” Alexandra writes. Her memoir is part of that process. William Styron’s illness may have prevented his making an appropriate response to her novel, “All the Finest Girls” (2001). Before then, however, she wrote some stories that he did read. “Dear Al,” he told her in a fax, “you really are a very good writer. More! More!” He got more — this is it — and he was right.

[Photograph by Saul Leiter]

feed Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share via email
"This ain't football. We do this every day."
--Earl Weaver