"A New York Treasure" --Village Voice
Category: Taster’s Cherce

Taster’s Cherce

keylimepie

The Wife and I were in Florida for a few days. On our flight home, a stewardess showed us a nifty trick. Squeeze a bit of lime on a Biscoff cookie and presto! you’ve got Key Lime pie.

F’realz.

Taster’s Cherce

herbfrites

Herbs…

Taster’s Cherce

cucumberpickle

Pickle. 

Taster’s Cherce

sun-noodle-Tsujita-ramen

Here comes the Sun King…

[Photo Credit: Frank Lee]

Taster’s Cherce

bossam

We made this for Christmas dinner. Actually, my brother made it and deserves all the credit because it was delicious. I made some of the condiments and I think a new holiday tradition was born.

[Photo Credit: New York Times]

Taster’s Cherce

birds

Boids. 

Taster’s Cherce

hotc

Liquid gold. 

Taster’s Cherce

15402414664_3768ef5bfb_o

Makes me wanna Challah. 

New York Minute

oct1411katz

Gothamist gives their picks for the 13 best sandwiches in town. 

[Photo Credit: RonG]

Taster’s Cherce

sage

Sage roasted cauliflower and chickpea pasta.

Taster’s Cherce

oxtails

This oxtail stew is no joke. 

[Photo Credit: M. Sylvia Smith]

Taster’s Cherce

gifts

Alexandra has a few gift ideas for the holidays. Listen up.

Taster’s Cherce

bruz

Sure shot. 

Taster’s Cherce

Here’s a beautiful little essay by the great Jhumpa Lahiri.

From Food & Wine (April, 2000):

I am the daughter of former pirates, of a kind. Our loot included gold, silver, even a few precious gems. Mainly though, it was food, so much that throughout my childhood I was convinced my parents were running the modern equivalent of the ancient spice trade. They didn’t exactly plunder this food; they bought it in the bazaars of Calcutta, where my mother was born and to which we returned as a family every couple of years. The destination was Rhode Island, where we lived, and where, back in the Seventies, Indian groceries were next to impossible to come by.

Our treasure chest, something we called the Food Suitcase, was an elegant relic from the Fifties with white stitching and brass latches that fastened shut with satisfying clicks. The inside was lined in peach-colored satin, had shirred lingerie pockets on three sides and was large enough to house a wardrobe for a long journey. Leave it to my parents to convert a vintage portmanteau into a portable pantry. They bought it one Saturday morning at a yard sale in the neighborhood, and I think it’s safe to say that it had never been to India before.

[Photo Via: Cooking Weekends]

Taster’s Cherce

pickled-cabbage-salad

In a pickle…

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--Earl Weaver