"A New York Treasure" --Village Voice
Category: Taster’s Cherce

Taster’s Cherce

oxtails

This oxtail stew is no joke. 

[Photo Credit: M. Sylvia Smith]

Taster’s Cherce

gifts

Alexandra has a few gift ideas for the holidays. Listen up.

Taster’s Cherce

bruz

Sure shot. 

Taster’s Cherce

Here’s a beautiful little essay by the great Jhumpa Lahiri.

From Food & Wine (April, 2000):

I am the daughter of former pirates, of a kind. Our loot included gold, silver, even a few precious gems. Mainly though, it was food, so much that throughout my childhood I was convinced my parents were running the modern equivalent of the ancient spice trade. They didn’t exactly plunder this food; they bought it in the bazaars of Calcutta, where my mother was born and to which we returned as a family every couple of years. The destination was Rhode Island, where we lived, and where, back in the Seventies, Indian groceries were next to impossible to come by.

Our treasure chest, something we called the Food Suitcase, was an elegant relic from the Fifties with white stitching and brass latches that fastened shut with satisfying clicks. The inside was lined in peach-colored satin, had shirred lingerie pockets on three sides and was large enough to house a wardrobe for a long journey. Leave it to my parents to convert a vintage portmanteau into a portable pantry. They bought it one Saturday morning at a yard sale in the neighborhood, and I think it’s safe to say that it had never been to India before.

[Photo Via: Cooking Weekends]

Taster’s Cherce

pickled-cabbage-salad

In a pickle…

New York Minute

sal's

Sal and Carmine’s on the upper west side. A representative New York slice. Thin crust and on the salty side but that suits me just fine.

Taster’s Cherce

friedchicken

Michael Ruhlman’s Rosemary-Brined, Buttermilk Fried Chicken.

Yes, please.

Taster’s Cherce

Cast-Iron-580x386

Don’t sweat the technique.

[Photo Via: Organic Spark]

Taster’s Cherce

Banh-Mi-Handbook-credit-Paige-Green

How to Make Banh Mi Rolls…

Taster’s Cherce

2953123485_dff303e541

What’s your favorite Halloween candy?

Here’s the sweetest. 

[Photo Credit: List Plan it]

Taster’s Cherce

miquang

Mi Quang: Seriously. 

[Photo Credit: Brian Oh]

New York Minute

Katz's Deli.

Check out this story at Slate by Jordan Weissmann on how Katz’s stays in business:

The newer generation of artisanal delicatessens that have risen up in recent years—restaurants like Brooklyn’s Mile End Deli and Washington, D.C.’s DGS Delicatessen—are fundamentally different. They serve their own excellent, obsessively sourced variations of house-cured and smoked pastrami (or Montreal-style “smoked meat,” in Mile End’s case). But volume isn’t really part of their equation. Instead, they emphasize profitable alcohol sales and have more varied menus with higher margin main dishes. And crucially, they can pack less meat onto the plate, which would be anathema at an old-school deli like Katz’s.

“Katz’s is super-special. It’s the only thing of its kind in the entire world,” Mile End’s founder, Noah Bernamoff, tells me.

The reason Katz’s was able to live on while its competitors disappeared largely boils down to real estate. As Sax writes in Save the Deli, New York’s delicatessens can basically be divided into two groups: those that rent their buildings and those that own. Famous renters, like the Stage Deli and 2nd Avenue Deli, have closed in the face of rent hikes. Famous owners, like Carnegie and Katz’s, have lived on. (And when 2nd Avenue Deli reopened, it bought a building … on New York’s 3rd Avenue). If Katz’s had to deal with a landlord, it would likely have disappeared or moved long ago.

[Photo Credit: Antonio Bonanno]

Taster’s Cherce

sourdough

The Clever Carrot gives sourdough noir. 

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"This ain't football. We do this every day."
--Earl Weaver